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SheNYC is the City’s premier festival showcasing new, original works by women, trans, & non-binary writers & composers.

JULY 30 – AUGUST 11, 2024
THE CONNELLY THEATER

SheNYC is the City’s premier festival showcasing new, original works by women, trans, & non-binary writers & composers.

JULY 30 – AUGUST 11, 2024
THE CONNELLY THEATER

Photo: Fort Huachuca by Ailema Sousa. Photo credit: Danielle DeMatteo.

TICKETS NOW ON SALE

 

For the 2024 SheNYC Summer Theater Festival!

The 2024 SheNYC Theater Festival will happen July 30-August 11 at The Connelly Theater. Tickets will be on sale June 3. 

Read on below for more information about each of the Festival shows that will hit the SheNYC stage this summer!

GET THE 3-SHOW PASS!

Lots of shows look good? Select the “3-Show Pass” when you click below!

For $80, you get: A single ticket to see 3 different shows in the festival + a free companion ticket to 1 of those shows + 1 free digital ticket to watch a virtual show in any of our cities!

Photo: 0874: A Filipino-American Love Story by Alex Palting, SheNYC 2023. Photo credit: Danielle DeMatteo.

PERFORMANCE SCHEDULE

Digital performances to be announced soon! You’ll be able to stream video recordings of select performances starting the week of August 12th. All digital ticket buyers will be able to watch the video for 1 week, so you can watch at your convenience.  

Performance Schedule

MEET THE SHOWS

Angel Makers

the angel makers

By Amanda Freedman (Book & Lyrics) and Lorenzo Pipino (Music & Lyrics)

A new musical based on the true story of the Hungarian women who took justice into their own hands to escape abusive marriages.

Suzannah, a midwife, arrives in Nagyrév, Hungary at the end of the Great War. When the men return home from the battlefield, they bring the war’s violence with them and domestic abuse becomes rampant. When one woman desperately seeks Suzannah’s help, she teams up with the coroner’s wife, Júlia, to run an operation designed to keep the women safe and earn back their freedom. But as the women gain power in their town—and the men grow terrified—the lines between evil and justice become blurred. 

The Bookstore

the bookstore

By Nancy Marie

The greatest weapon against ignorance is a book.

Mark Lee Johnson’s attempt to fulfill his dream of meeting Malcolm X and getting his autograph leads him to the bookstore of Sister Ura Shazad in Harlem, and an immediate and seemingly unbreakable bond forms between them after they witness Malcolm’s assassination. But three years later, Mark Lee returns to the bookstore – this time, as an inside agent in the COINTELPRO operation launched against Black-owned bookstores. How long will Mark Lee last before he’s caught by those who thought they could trust him? This play is loosely based on and in memory of Sister Una Mulzac and the Liberation Bookstore. 

Borderland

borderland

A new musical by Natalie Elizabeth Weiss (Book, Music, and Lyrics)

A dark comedy about Ida C. Craddock, a real-life 19th-century sexologist who claimed to be married to an angel.

The first person to put the words “female orgasm” in print, Ida had a bone to pick with Victorian America’s view of sexuality. Enlightened by supernatural sex with her heavenly husband, Ida empowered other married couples through a mail-order sex education program. However, when her educational literature was discovered by postal inspector Anthony Comstock, Ida was charged with “obscenity” under his namesake law: The Comstock Act. Equal parts DJ set and opera, this unorthodox musical explores Ida’s struggle for liberty and reveals surprising similarities between the polarizing politics of the 19th century and the world we live in today. 
Fish Meat

fish meat

By Esmé Maria Ng

 
An examination of the fraught intertwinement of labor, sexual violence, and the complex beauty of marine biology.
 
FISH MEAT braids the lives of Mingzhu, a 14 year old girl on a boat going from Hong Kong to San Francisco in 1890, and Ro, a PhD candidate studying marine biology in present-day California. Merging marine taxonomy, Lewis Carroll, and histories of immigration and exploitation, this heartfelt play explores how our care for others can reveal the care we deserve for ourselves and asks: How do we categorize sexual violence?
Mere Waters

mere waters

By Jillian Blevins

A Jewish abortion play about mothers, daughters, faith and survival through the Holocaust.

In 1944, Gynecologist Gisella Perl arrives at Auschwitz and is assigned to work as the camp doctor. She has no tools, no antiseptic, no water. Guided by two bickering biblical prophetesses, Gisella treats prisoners who have fallen pregnant; some have been assaulted, some have traded sex for life-saving goods, others just wanted to feel something aside from pain. When she realizes the scope of evil being perpetrated in the hospital, she undertakes a spiritual mission to ensure the safety and survival of the women in her care by performing secret, life-saving abortions.

Fish Meat

fish meat

By Esmé Maria Ng

 
An examination of the fraught intertwinement of labor, sexual violence, and the complex beauty of marine biology.
 
FISH MEAT braids the lives of Mingzhu, a 14 year old girl on a boat going from Hong Kong to San Francisco in 1890, and Ro, a PhD candidate studying marine biology in present-day California. Merging marine taxonomy, Lewis Carroll, and histories of immigration and exploitation, this heartfelt play explores how our care for others can reveal the care we deserve for ourselves and asks: How do we categorize sexual violence?
Mere Waters

mere waters

By Jillian Blevins

A Jewish abortion play about mothers, daughters, faith and survival through the Holocaust.

In 1944, Gynecologist Gisella Perl arrives at Auschwitz and is assigned to work as the camp doctor. She has no tools, no antiseptic, no water. Guided by two bickering biblical prophetesses, Gisella treats prisoners who have fallen pregnant; some have been assaulted, some have traded sex for life-saving goods, others just wanted to feel something aside from pain. When she realizes the scope of evil being perpetrated in the hospital, she undertakes a spiritual mission to ensure the safety and survival of the women in her care by performing secret, life-saving abortions.

Mud; or when things get messy and how we live with it.

mud; or when things get messy and how we live with it

By Camille Simone Thomas

A play about surviving bi-polar disorder and coming together as a family.

After having a bipolar disorder-induced psychotic break during the lockdown of 2020, 19-year-old Zuma is the newest resident in the hospital’s psych ward. While she struggles to come to terms with a previously unknown mental illness, her siblings point the blame at God, themselves, and each other. As she vacillates between clarity and chaos, her siblings must come together and work through shame, secrets, and strife to discover what it really means to be a family.  

The Station

the station

By Maggie Cregan

A darkly comic drama about the reality of a conspiracy theory.

A young woman must take desperate measures when a QAnon-like conspiracy theory starts wreaking havoc in her small town. As a practicing hypochondriac and an adulterous born-again Christian, gas station cashier Davina entertains a few delusions of her own. But she can only watch incredulously and argue fruitlessly when the strongest person she knows, her foster mother, starts painting over windows and drinking urine. As her relationships with her foster mother, foster sister, and (secret) boyfriend hang in the balance, Davina resolves to track down the mastermind behind the mysterious posts…and then must decide what to do with the culprit.

Dead Air

dead air

A new play by 2024 SheNYC Resident Playwright Kristen Milburn

This production developed with the support of 59E59 Theaters. 

October 23, 1962: Four days until Michael Zann’s Halloween party. Also, the world might be blown to smithereens in a devastating nuclear war. The girls in the Reading High School Radio Club didn’t plan on entering a radio competition at the height of the Cuban Missile Crisis, but push ahead with their broadcast as they contend with what it means to have a literal way to use their voices while stumbling through girlhood and impending destruction. 

 All SheNYC Summer Theater Festival In-Person Performances are at the Connelly Theater, 220 East 4th Street, in the East Village.

The venue is wheelchair accessible for seating. Note that while the restroom is accessible without stairs, there are no wide stalls in the bathroom. If you need wheelchair-accessible restrooms, email us for more information. The theater has all-gender restrooms, and we will provide ASL interpretation at select performances, to be announced. See our Accessibility page for more information, and email info@shenycarts.org if you have any accessibility concerns or requests!

Artist Directory

Are you a stage manager, director, choreographer, musical director, or designer? Add your name to our Artist Directory. We’ll send the writers this list of artists as a reference to help them fill in any blanks on their production teams. (Note that we don’t take actors on the Artist Directory – we will have a separate casting call in May for actors). 

Pro Tip: Write “Festival Producer” or “Festival Volunteer” under “what’s your specialty” if you’re interested in volunteering for the Festival as a whole!

Frequently Asked Questions

How do I get tickets to a Festival show?

Tickets for the SheNYC and SheLA Festival Shows will be on sale June 3! SheATL and SheDFW tickets will be on sale in July. At that time, you can head back here to our website to select the performances you want to see. When you check out, you’ll be sent a confirmation email. We will also offer subscription packages for those who want to see multiple festival shows. 

In-person performances will happen in the city of each festival, but all of the Festivals will have select recorded performances that will be available for online viewing. Check back when tickets are on sale to get your digital ticket, and view the Festival shows from anywhere! 

 

When will submissions open for the 2025 Festivals?

Script submissions will open in September 2024 for the 2025 SheLA, SheATL, & SheNYC Theater Festivals. They’ll be due by November 15.

SheDFW Festival submissions may open a little later – date TBD!

At that time, the application will be live at www.SheNYCArts.org/submissions.

What is it like to do my show in the Festival?

Once you get accepted into the Festival, you’ll want to start thinking about a director for your show. We can help with that, and other creative team roles, by sharing our Artist Directory.

Next, casting! Work with your director to get your show cast, and hire any other creative team members you might need.

Then you’ll spend the 1-2 months before your performance date rehearsing and getting your show ready. Simply put, you handle your show in the rehearsal room, while our staff gets the theater ready. Our Producers and Production Manager will be checking in often to get information from you and keep you on deadline.

Our Festival staff loads all our equipment into the theater the day before tech starts. You’ll have an assigned 5-hour tech slot in which you must load in your set & costumes, do a cue-to-cue so our Lighting Designer can cue your lights, and then do a dress run of your show.

After that, you have 2-3 performances scheduled by our Production Manager. You have 15 minutes to load in your show before each performance, and 15 minutes to load out after. We handle everything related to Front of House – ticketing, box office, ushers, etc. – so all you have to worry about is what’s happening on stage.

Finally, we close the Festival with a closing night party and awards ceremony!

What makes us different from other theater festivals?

Our goal is to make this an inclusive, productive, and affordable environment to see your work produced in full. We pride ourselves on providing more for less – more support, supplies, and learning opportunities without the prohibitive submission & participation fees that other festivals require.

Also, we’re working to create a network of professionals and artists that are devoted to promoting the voices of women & gender-marginalized professionals in theater — not just put up your show and never hear from you again. We have meetings where all of the writers gather together to mingle, and hope that the other writers and artists involved in the festival will become lifelong friends, mentors, and supporters. 

What are we looking for?

You’ve got an awesome show. We’ve got an awesome festival. It’s like a match made in heaven.

We look simply for shows that are high-quality and written by people of marginalized genders. We like to have a good mix of genres in each festival – plays, musicals, comedies, dramas, experimental works, and more. We also are partial to shows with themes that fit our mission of women in leadership. But at the end of the day, we want to show the world that our playwrights produce high-quality work that deserves to be seen on Broadway and stages around the country – so, the number one factor in our decision-making is how well-written your show is.

Who can apply?

Any writer of a marginalized gender (including cis women, trans women, non-binary and gender non-conforming writers), or writing team that is at least 50% marginalized genders, is eligible to apply. We’re also taking adaptations that are directed or adapted by folks of marginalized genders, even if they were originally written by men. We only accept full-length shows for the Festival (no short plays), though note that there is a 2-hour run time limit for your performance.

What kind of shows can apply?

Musicals – musicals of any size, shape, and form are welcome to apply. Just keep in mind that 2-hour run time limit. You can submit a show that runs longer than that in its current form, as long as you’re okay with making some trims for the festival.

Plays – again, plays of any size, shape, and form are welcome to apply! 

Adaptations – are you a woman director or adapter who wants to do a reverse-gender production of King Lear? We love that. Just make sure you are actually able to obtain the rights to your show (sometimes, special rights have to be obtained if you want to adapt or change gender roles), or better yet, take a public domain play.

How many shows are picked and how will we pick them?

We’re aiming to take 8 shows for our She NYC Summer Theater Festival, though we reserve the right to pick as little as 6 or as many as 9 depending on what the submission pool is like. For our She L.A. Summer Theater Festival, we’ll pick 5 shows. For Atlanta, we’ll pick 3-5.

We’re judging the shows based on two things: The quality of the writing, and the relevance to our mission. Mostly, we’re focused on giving marginalized writers the notoriety and publicity they deserve, so the subject matter of your show will only play into the judging if we have a really tight race between two shows. If we’ve got one slot left and two equally awesome shows, and one is about Napoleon and one is about Molly Pitcher, we’ll probably pick the Molly Pitcher one.

How does the selection process work?

You submit your scripts and application materials by the submission deadline. We pass your script around to a team of script readers, so each script will be read by at least three different people. The shows that get the highest ratings get passed along to the semi-final round, where they will be read by at least two more script readers, with the highest-scoring shows moving to the finalist round. Starting in February, we’ll be notifying people if they’re finalists on a rolling basis. From there, the finalists are read by our full staff, and we make our final decisions after an in-depth team discussion.

​By April, all of our selected participants will be notified, and we can start getting to work!

If I submitted a show in the past, can I submit again?

You sure can! You can submit the same show again, particularly if you’ve revised it, or a new show. If you’ve already had a show produced in the Festival, you can also submit a new show for this year. 

Will we get feedback on our submissions?

Because we don’t charge a submission fee and get such a large volume of submissions, we unfortunately don’t have the bandwidth to offer feedback on each script.

The SheNYC Summer Theater Festival is funded in part by the generous support of: 

Public Funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, in Partnership with the City Council 

The National Endowment for the Arts

A.R.T./New York’s NYC Small Theatres Fund made possible with support from the Howard Gilman Foundation

The New York State Council on the Arts

Humanities New York